About us

If you are looking for advice please ring our main number 0141 440 2503 – or there are more detail on our Contact Us page.

Govan Law Centre (GLC) is a free legal resource (Scottish charity no. SCO30193). Our main office is located at the Orkney Street Enterprise Centre in Glasgow.

Through the legal practice of Dailly & Co., Solicitors. We undertake expert advice, court and tribunal representation in Scotland. GLC is a member of Glasgow City Council’s Glasgow Advice Partnership (GAP) which part funds its work across the south and east of Glasgow.

What we do: We use the law to challenge poverty, discrimination and disadvantage. We specialise in housing, landlord and tenant, homelessness, welfare rights, money advice, social services,  consumer and debt. We also have a education law unit and we do a lot of work with carers and around mental health. We also have a project for private sector tenants.

Tel: 0141 440 2503. Our telephone and e-mail systems are subject to monitoring and recording by us for quality control, training and evidentiary purposes.

Govan Law Centre Location map.

What Are Law Centres?

Law centres are non-for-profit legal practice, run by and for the community.  They cover different geographical areas, or focus on client groups or specific areas of the law.

Law centres defend the legal rights of people who cannot afford a lawyer. They are specialists working in their local communities to uphold justice and advance equality defend the legal rights of people who cannot afford a lawyer. They are specialists working in their local communities to uphold justice and advance equality.

They are prolific in developing new remedies for those in disadvantage. Law centres originally developed the ‘reasonableness defence’ and the use of minutes for recall of decree (protecting tenants from losing their homes). Remedies for tenants and children living in damp housing conditions were promoted and developed by Glasgow law centres (in particular enforcing repairs and child asthma remedies).

In general, Law Centres also undertake a very large proportion of the representation undertaken in Scotland – including judicial review in homelessness cases, defending evictions, representation in mental health hearings, representation at employment and benefit tribunals, criminal injuries compensation appeal panels and immigration adjudicator hearings.

Law centres do not keep what they learn to themselves – they provide free or low cost educational training and information seminars on a large scale, as well as writing an extensive number of leaflets, articles, media work, websites, journals and legal text books.